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How to get onboarding right: The 7 C’s for success

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Lindsay Snider 

Hi everyone. Thanks again for joining the webinar today. My name is Lindsay Snider and I’m on the Axonify Marketing Team and will be joining discussion with you. We’re thrilled to bring together Jasha Fletcher from BT and David pairing from the Fosway Group to discuss how to get onboarding right, the 7 C’s for success.

Lindsay Snider 

Talking about our speakers today we have Jasha, she is the head of learning architectural design at BT consumer, a division of the Global Communications Company DT, where three band brands BT, EM and Plus Net that connects customers to information, entertainment, friends and family at home and on the move. She heads up a creative team who are responsible for creating impactful and engaging learning solutions for around 20,000 frontline employees who serve 30 million customers from contact centers and more than 620 High Street Stores around the UK. Then we have David Perring from the Fosway Group. David has been a[inaudible 00:01:01] professional for over 30 years. Over that time, he has always been at the forefront of learning innovation and has retained a strong sense of optimism, energy and passion for transforming organizational learning and performance. Today, he holds a truly unique and privileged position as a Director of Research for Fosway Group. He independently explores the experiences of practitioners and suppliers to understand the realities of what’s happening in corporate learning, what’s inspiring change and what truly makes a difference. I welcome David and Jasha and we’re ready to dive in.

David Perring   

Thanks so much Lindsay. It’s a great pleasure to be here again, I know we did a session not so long ago and I know as usual we have a very packed agenda. What I want to do is if we can go through this as quickly as possible, I want to make sure that Jasha gets lots of times talk about her experience back about 20 minutes[inaudible 00:01:57] cover off a little bit of this around.

David Perring

Why is it important to get onboarding right? Got some interesting stats that we’ve been trolling around through our research to try and surface which[inaudible 00:02:09] you in arguing for maybe more resources potentially into your onboarding but also going to explore the subtleties of successful onboarding, maybe a lens but you can use to judge your own onboarding process using and think about how you’d rate your own process and then think about how you might improve it. What we’re going to do is get some interaction on early and we’ve got a question for you in the form of a poll because we want to know how good was your onboarding when you joined your organization?

David Perring 

Quite often people don’t necessarily quite understand how important a good onboarding process is. What I’d like you to do is just choose you got some choices on the right hand side which gives you a choice of was it great? Was it good? Was it okay? Or was it poor? and I think we should just allow you a little bit of time to vote. Lindsay if you can just keep an eye and let us know how we’re doing on the voting front, we will then share the results and hopefully then maybe not skip shock you too much with the implications of having a good, okay, poor or great onboarding process. We give you a little countdown 5 4 3 2 1 and maybe if we can close the poll, we can get a chance to see what the results were. I can’t see the[inaudible 00:03:33] unfortunately.

David Perring 

Lindsay [inaudible 00:03:35] you were able to share the results for us and share the on screen.[inaudible 00:03:40] I can’t see them myself.

Lindsay Snider 

We have the results and 40% said good, 10% okay, 10% great and 30% said poor.

David Perring 

That’s an interesting spread. I think the next bit of data that we gave you it’d be really interesting especially for those guys who a “okay” or “poor” experience and even if you have a good experience, is this room for improvement? but those people who got the 10%, give yourselves a pat on the back because yours won’t be such a significant issue for you as others. The reason this is important and people don’t quite understand properly that implications of this as much as they should do is that, if you hire people, you need to keep them from as long as possible and help them be productive, as productive as possible. Now, the stats that we’ve got, the results that we shared around our voting here is maybe a little bit worse than those who filled out a Gallup Survey recently.

David Perring

According to a recent Gallup poll, 88% of organizations don’t think they do a great onboarding experience. Only 12% of employees thought there was a great job. That maybe as correlate to you, [inaudible 00:04:57] difference which is a shockingly 8 out of 10 people don’t get a great introduction to their organization and if you think about… this is when people are the most enthusiastic, when they’re most engaged. This is really quite scary because it has some very serious consequences. Those consequences include things like the retention of employees and their productivity. A survey again by Glassdoor show the intent retention has improved by 80% if you have a great onboarding process and productivity is improved by over 70% if you have a great onboarding process. This is real hard business reasons for this.

David Perring 

If you think about the impact on people themselves and their emotional commitment to your organization, if they have a negative experience and potentially an okay to poor is a negative experience, you’re twice as likely to look the career opportunities in the future. Just to help you understand how quickly those career opportunities start to bite, a quarter of people leave their job in the first 60 days, according to a survey I picked up recently through Sweet Spot. 33% know whether they will stay longer term after the first week. That’s just to help you understand the level of implications around this. First week[inaudible 00:06:21] would know when they want to leave, 20% will leave it in 60 days, you need to get this right because it has big implications on your business. Not just in terms of people leaving but the cost to hire is really big.

David Perring

In the UK, the average cost of hire is £3000 per individual, it takes 27 and a half days to get somebody in. Overall the total cost of the employee is about a third of a worker’s annual salary if they leave so again this is a big problem if you don’t keep them and you’ve invested a lot of money in hiring them. Equally, the bigger cost in the war for talent is significant to one in four companies according to McKinsey and I did this research about two years ago, showed that people have left… one in four companies have left a vacancy open because they couldn’t find somebody with the right skills.

David Perring 

That scale of issue is something that was picked up. Recently, an article by Tim Berners-Lee, who was the father of the Internet. He was just reflecting on the number of changes the technical technological transformations that are happening in organizations as a result of sustainability, new technologies, AI, all these wonderful things that are happening around us with chat bots and intelligence and robotics. There aren’t enough people that have all this[inaudible 00:07:38] is the fact that the existing pool of skilled workers just isn’t going to be big enough to meet demand. If you’re looking to the future of your organization, if you’re getting people in and then they leave after 60 days or they’re leaving after three years even, if you’ve got good people then you’re not going to be able to fill your talent gap, it’s just going to grow.

David Perring 

It’s really important to get onboarding right, it’s one of those essential things, it really matters. The thing that you need to think about when you’re doing onboarding is maybe these two variables. The first is to think about what you deliver in terms of formal onboarding and what you arrange in terms of orientation. Adding these two together is typically what people talk about as Normal Structured Onboarding plan and the only thing I can think about probably include as next relevant interview is just to also think about the social side. If the formal bit is about having a controlled scheduled environment where you have organized tasks, maybe organized activities, maybe it happens in the classroom or an event based action area or it’s just a matter of connecting people in that onboarding group. You can have this structure that enables them to[inaudible 00:08:49] for work, once they get into your organization but also the orientating matters in terms of helping people connect with their network.

David Perring

It’s about showing them who they need to work with and get a sense of how they connect and what they need to… how they relate to individuals elsewhere, as customers, maybe as inputs into what they do and you can support that through shadowing, buddying, one to one coaching, you can arrange meetings with managers. Social leaders just like[inaudible 00:09:18] to feel more at home. The importance of having these things stashed together in terms of having a structured onboarding plan is really important.

David Perring 

We have another survey for you, we have a question for you. Another poll. Which is in terms of your organization, does your organization have this sense of a structured onboarding process[inaudible 00:09:42] structured onboarding plan for its new starters? What we’d like you to do is vote yes, no, or if you don’t know, don’t know and we just give you a few minutes to make a choice around that and submit your response. Then I’ll just going to give you some data, which helps you understand potentially the impact of that for your organization. Everything that we do which is an optimal around onboarding really affects our bottom line and survivability as a business. Lindsay, I don’t know if we can close the survey and also share the results so that people can see the effect. What I’ll do is also move on a couple of slides so that we can see.

David Perring 

Good news, lots of you have a structured onboarding process which means that, when your employees go through your programs there’s 58% more likely to stay. If you look out over three years, 55% more likely to stay in your organization. If you have a great onboarding experience, they’re almost 70% more likely to stay after three years. It’s not just about how long they stay as a result of you having that structured onboarding process, it’s also a matter of productivity. From that Glassdoor survey again, organizations with a strong onboarding process or experience have 50% greater new-hire productivity and if it’s a strong process or strong experience, 70% higher productivity. Just to give you a sense, you probably need to think a little bit about what are the implications of my organization especially if you’re the person who said, “No” it does really bite your organization.

David Perring 

What I wanted to do is take you through very quickly, a sense of what are the components of a structured onboarding process but just give you also a sense of how standardized are people in their approach to the onboarding? but also on top of that, how satisfied they are. If you look down the list, these are all the different silos of systems that you get around HR. You can see only a third of people, just less than 30 people have a very standardized process, partially standardized up 70% but almost a whopping 25% don’t have any standardized systems to support onboarding. You have to think about what the implications on that are, how you scale and create an effective onboarding process and when you look at how satisfied people believe their executive board are with the systems that support these different parts of the HR operation. Right down the bottom, second off the bottom onboarding. Only 10% think that the stakeholders, the executive board are very satisfied with the onboarding that people go through.

David Perring     

In terms of being satisfied overall 60% but those who are dissatisfied[inaudible 00:12:44] that’s 40%, which is a massive amount. If you think about what we said about retention, you think about productivity of new employees, this is really important. We’re not going to dwell too much on the systems although they are important.

David Perring

What we do want to do is just transition into, “So what makes Onboarding successful?” and we’ve come up with 7 C’s of successful Onboarding. These are way that you can use as a lens on to how you judge the effectiveness of what you do as an overall Onboarding process and what we pick out are connection, clarity, compliance, culture, competence, which is very much wrapped to the next one, competence and care. Typically, people talk about a 4 C’s. I think these extra three are mega important in terms of how you think about creating a great Onboarding experience and think about your onboarding story linked to each one of these areas. That’s the really important part of this. When you judge the quality of your Onboarding, is almost the stories that people would tell to their friends and their neighbors and their loved ones about what it was like to join your organization through these lenses. If you do each one of these well they are going to be much stronger advocates for you when you need them to be.

David Perring 

Let’s look at each one of these in turn. I’m going to start with connections and I think this is a really strong truism. It’s not what you know, it’s who you know. It’s something that I think we probably know intrinsically that actually being able to navigate your way around the organization is what makes you effective, especially as you get more senior in organizations but even when you’re quite Junior. Knowing who pulls the strings, how to get things done, is often a matter of relationship rather than necessarily just a matter of process and understanding how the formal process, it’s the relationships that you build and those relationships are important only because it helps you get things done but it also helps you feel as though you belong.

David Perring 

What organizations from an ACI survey said is, they find that having ambassador or buddy join the onboarding process is more effective way to speed up new high proficiency and that’s almost 90% would apply that as being a positive way to create connection but it’s also something you need to build into the methodology of what you do, which is about how you connect people with their network in terms of the organization, link with people that have shared likes, make sure you have a structured engagement around[inaudible 00:15:15] clients and customers, how they connect with your influences within your organizations, how they know who the enablers and blockers around things, who makes things happen, and these relationships really matter.

David Perring 

It’s really interesting again from the research we did, just broadly around and doing or hunting down some data around this. There are some really interesting organizations like Cora, and they expect that somebody who’s mentoring somebody through their organizations helping them to connect, helping them to navigate the organization will lose around 25% of their personal output during the first weeks of their training because they are helping other people connect and I think that’s something just that’s really interesting to think about how you support and forster connection is something that makes people belong and makes them feel as though they can contribute.

David Perring 

Equally important is, why do we hire you? And what are you here to do as an individual? and it’s quite shocking that 60% of organizations fail to set goals for new starters so they have no sense of vision, they have no sense of purpose, they have no goals and objectives[inaudible 00:16:25] key results. These are things that help people prioritize, it promotes teamwork, it helps us track progress, it highlights the importance of contribution and it affirms why we hired you. What skills we expecting you to bring to our organization. Actually makes people feel better about why they joined it’s really interesting. If you look at some research we are getting pulled out and highlighted, Facebook as a good example, within 45 minutes on day one a new employee is underway on that first projects.

David Perring 

There’s a lot of intensive preparation that’s done in advance but they believe that drives autonomy, it drives trusting new hires, and it helps them get a focus on delivering things really quickly around what they’re doing as a business. I think there is something about… it sets a cultural overtone and I come into culture in a minute around. Do we talk constructively and continuously about performance? Do we talk about what makes it great to be here? Do we focus on customer value? Do we have a clear sense of our achievements as an organization and recognize those? If you do not have clarity around these things, goals, purpose, objectives then you cannot provide really strong feedback to make people[inaudible 00:17:38] recognition anyway. Clarity is really important, you need to build that strongly into your process.

David Perring

Equally compliance, I think this is something that most organizations do amazingly well. If you look at most[inaudible 00:17:50] organizations learning programs, they are really rich in compliance so I don’t think I necessarily need to dwell too long on this point, other than to say it is about your license to operate and certain industries you do need to know that people are compliant with the law or where the regulations before they start, sometimes they have to be certified. Even just in terms of things like display[inaudible 00:18:10] screen equipment, health and safety or the data regulations, GDPR, technical competence, legal frameworks that you need to be aware of, those are really important table stakes.

David Perring       

Increasingly, we see organizations trying to push those into the pre boarding process when people are excited about joining the organization like most of these elements, this isn’t necessary just to tell you one thing but PPC people trying to push those out to people who are pre starters just to make sure that they can make the most of the people-time[inaudible 00:18:39]. The biggest challenges, there is so much paperwork and so much compliance that we don’t get just lost in that thinking that we’ve achieved a great onboarding because we’ve ticked off the compliance box because that isn’t necessarily the only significant part of the journey.

David Perring 

The other thing that’s really important is culture. Typically people are increasingly trying to hire people around that cultural alignment and cultural fit is really important. If you look at organizations like Zappos in the US, they will pay people to leave. If you don’t feel as though you fit in that organization, they will offer you money to pay you to go because they know how important is to maintain the continuity of the culture. The engagement is about being immersed in the culture and it’s not just about communicating with people about the brands and the experience. It’s about how you do your work and I think this culture thing like I said before, it’s your hour by hour story of your onboarding which also reflects your culture. If you’re a collaborative culture and you say that it’s important to you don’t have any collaboration in the first day with people in the team, then you’re not living up to your cultural values.See this is a two way street, right? One is how the onboarding process leaves the values of your culture but also how you immerse the person in the culture themselves. People like LinkedIn, they will have their[inaudible 00:20:02] crews join other new hires and other people in the organization do icebreakers, do introductions which helps them share their interests and ambitions and makes them also share deeply about what the culture is.

David Perring 

Now, the next thing, again, something that we don’t necessarily think about in terms of I might link these two together is Competence and Confidence. I know that’s something that is particularly passionate around the guys at Axonify, they combine these two methods with lots of good reasons to do that and I know Jasha is going to talk through what that means in her context at BT and the great work she’s been doing there. What you have to remember is a quarter of companies say they or admit to some extent that they don’t include any form of training in their induction, in their onboarding and that leads to a loss of 20%-60% of their workforce. The whole timeline around how long it takes somebody to be competent… and have you had really competent people but there’s always things that people need to learn to be specific in your organization.

David Perring

[inaudible 00:21:01] remember that it takes an average employee five months to reach full productivity and only one in three organizations extend the onboarding beyond the first month. This is a really important part around… you need people to not only be competent but show that they are confident and be able to highlight areas where they are confident but incompetent. That reduces your risk but also, it’s a great foundation once you get that insight to provide people with a personalized development plans which enable you to atollerate them into your organization. This is not just about the regulations, this is about also maybe but to some extent, their career aspirations, the things that you need them to do to stretch and grow as individuals, which is why they would have joined your organization in the first place, to start to highlight that. Not only as your short term journey of getting them ready to work and face your customers but also help them progress in your organization.

David Perring 

That maybe takes us to the next element which I’d highlight, which is all about care. When somebody joins your organization, you need to show them that they belong and you need to have within your culture a strong sense of care. That doesn’t make[inaudible 00:22:15] does a few different ways. It is about just having some humanity and saying, we’re not going to let this person go to lunch on their own in the first week, we’re going to make sure that we always go to lunch with them because we want to know who they are, we take an interest and pride in involving people, make them feel like they belong. There are some interesting informal things that are social that you need to start to build into your onboarding, but also just the reputation around your company and where people want to work. If you want to have a strong employer brand that is reflective of your culture and people who care more attractive to people who want to be recruited but equally those people who… or millennial should I say for example[inaudible 00:22:58] selected boys based on health and well being benefits packages.

David Perring 

There is an element of this which is about health and fitness. There’s also just[inaudible 00:23:05] human heart side of this and certain organizations think about making day one inspirational, they do celebrate. They have goodies packed, they have branded goods, they have balloons on desks but I think with the stretching the challenges, if you think about the number of people who want to leave your organization in that first 60 days[inaudible 00:23:25] you to think about how you create this ongoing. Not just day one inspiration, but week inspiration, week two inspiration, week three inspiration, week four inspiration. This continuous basis of inspiration for working for you and wanting to stick around.I just want to highlight with care is I think a great transition to think about people’s careers. You might think that on somebody’s is onboarding it’s the wrong time to help them think about their career but ultimately, your millennial workforce, they’re looking to move within two years. 60% will leave in two years and well another 40% will move within a year so you got 25% after 60 days, 40% of millennials leaving within a year.

David Perring 

The reason they will stay is that they see they have a future with you and you need to be very proactive about talking about their career opportunities and move… change this really quite a shocking stat that you’re more likely to get a promotion as a result of leaving an organization than if you stay with your existing employer, three times more likely to get promoted if you leave. No wonder people leave organizations if that’s the only way they can get promoted. Once we cannot guarantee that we can promote everybody in our organization, understanding and fueling the individual employability is part of building sense of belonging, a sense of direction, a sense of opportunity in your organization as well so I’d really encourage you to help start encouraging your managers or[inaudible 00:25:00] process you have in place to also within those first 60 days, within that first 30 days even to say, “So where do you want to be in this organization? You’ve been here for a few days, where do you want to transition to?” and that is really important to sort of think about how we move into that zone and think about how we move people from the sense of, “I’ve joined your organization, I can see you care. I also see I have a future here” and try and help people transition in that way is what’s really important.

David Perring 

Now, I’m at fear of over running my time so I’m going to draw a line there so we leave enough time for Jasha to explain how she’s brought, particularly the confidence and competence side together for BT and the great impact it’s had on her employees and why we sort transition. Lindsay I don’t know if there is any questions or whether we just want to switch directly over to Jasha and pick the questions up at the end. How do you want to move forward?

Lindsay Snider 

We have one question on the line and if for anyone who wants to submit a question, there’s a Q&A on the right hand panel so please feel free to add your questions in there and we’ll address it throughout the presentation. If you had one action to do tomorrow to help with on onboarding, where would you start?

David Perring 

What I’d recommend is go and speak to your most recent onborders and use those 7 C’s to get them to tell you the story of what their experience was like. Using the voice of the customer to influence and understand what the real experience is like, is so important. The more of that you can gather, the better insight you will have around where you need to focus your attention and the more people you speak to, the better insight you will have around what will make a difference. I suppose my first point of course, the first thing I do is go and speak to the customers, go and speak to the people who’ve just been in[inaudible 00:27:02] onboarding for a week, maybe go back to speak to them if they’ve been there two weeks. Speak to everybody who’s been there for three weeks and find out what they’ve learned. Probably the sooner you get some feedback, the better.

Lindsay Snider 

Okay, wonderful. We have one more question before we move on to your portion Jasha, who would typically buy to own onboarding in a business?

David Perring 

I think it’s one of those things which is a matrix problem, okay. It cannot be owned by a group or core function. You have to work hand in glove… you have to must be sewn together like Siamese twins, with the people who will deliver this in your business. I think if I had to put a waiting around this, I’d probably say that you need maybe 80% to live in the business itself, and 20% to be provided by you as a facilitator if you worked in a group function but you have to be hand in glove. The ownership and mostly activity happens at a local level so you need to find out what sustainable for them but you cannot own it from a group function, you cannot be there for everybody.

David Perring 

You need to know that your culture is ticking for people naturally in the flow of work once without a phrase. I’d really recommend you stitching yourselves together really close to your business and keeping an eye together. Agree the metrics which help you understand whether it’s making a difference. These are things that keep it live and if you talking about the business outcome impacts of getting it wrong, then you’ll have people’s ears.

Lindsay Snider

Wonderful. Thank you David for your insights into the research on the 7 C’s. We can pick things up with you Jasha.

Jasha Fletcher 

Show hi. Thanks everyone and David I’d completely agree with you on that last point. It absolutely is a matrix. You definitely can’t do it on your own and although the training team have a big role to play, certainly in our organization, we have to work very closely with our operational colleagues and our training delivery team as well. [inaudible 00:29:02] that works that you mentioned earlier on in your presentation so I totally agree with you. What I’d like to do today is just share the experience that we had when we improve the onboarding for the consumer side of BT, which is where I work. As Lindsay mentioned at the beginning of the call, BT consumer is made up of three brilliant brands; BT, EM, Plus Net. We serve around 30 million customers and my team are responsible for the creation of all the learning for around 20,000 customer facing colleagues.

Jasha Fletcher 

What I’m going to focus on is the competence and confidence element of the 7 C’s that David presented and also just touch on some of the cultural changes that we’ve been able to introduce by improving the onboarding experience using Axonify’s micro learning platform for our[inaudible 00:29:59] entrance.

Jasha Fletcher   

It all started a couple years ago actually, when our customers told us that they prefer to speak to UK contact centers rather than overseas. Now of course, we listened because customers are very important to us and we made a absolutely big decision to bring the customer conversations back into the UK. We invested a great deal into an accelerated recruitment campaign that would see us recruit 1000 new jobs over a short period of time to be able to handle that work coming back into the UK. Now for me, that meant that we had to train quite a lot of people very quickly and make sure that they were[inaudible 00:30:44] to answer customer calls competently and confidently, as quickly as possible as well. I needed a way to be able to reduce the training in the classroom but make sure it was still engaging, sticky so key information could be retained and record efficiently when it absolutely mattered during those customer conversations.

Jasha Fletcher 

What I was looking for was a way to be able to make sure the new recruits work more knowledgeable, they were more… they could deliver a better experience, they are more confident when they were talking to our customers and we needed to get them online as fast as possible. Quite a tall order and what I did was, I actually turned to learning technologies to say -excuse me- what we could do there. Just before I explained the technology aspects of it, let me just take you to become a contact center advisor because to be a really successful contact center advisor, it’s actually quite hard and being a mediocre ones not very easy either. A lot of people come into contact center roles thinking that it’s actually a low skilled job but when you think of what they’ve got to do, in the minutes that they’re answering that call and speaking to a customer.

Jasha Fletcher 

They’ve actually got to strike up a rapport with somebody that they never met before. They’ve got to interpret the mood based on just what they’re hearing in their voice and then the information that they’ve gotten the screen from their account, then they’ve got to tailor their approach and the conversation and their tone and the words that they’re using accordingly. They’ve also got to understand our product portfolio which is quite complex and how that fits into what the customers needs are.

Jasha Fletcher 

Then they’ve got to achieve a series of business outcomes within a set time frame. If that’s not enough, they’ve got to navigate really complex systems and record information as they go along. I suppose in some ways you could say it’s a little bit like driving… learning to drive. When you first start off, you can only manage one thing at a time. With a bit of practice you can manage more until you get to the point where you’re fully competent and confident and actually driving home from work appears to happen by magic, when you’re not stuck in a traffic jam, of course.

Jasha Fletcher 

So our new entrants we ave to absorb a lot of information and then they need to practice on our systems so that they can have those brilliant conversations with our customers. Where we’ve had problems in the past with our onboarding is, they come out of training knowing everything they need to know but once they get on the job, they’ve actually forgot the less common customer interactions and sometimes, forgot how to find information that they need to re-remember as well.

Jasha Fletcher 

Another important consideration is how the role is structured. As you know in contact centers, time really is money and that is… that makes it very precious. Everything is scheduled down to a minute and because every minute is a minute that could be spent speaking to our customers, we needed to find a new approach that would help us take all of this into account. Started exploring ways that we could reduce the time, improve the knowledge retention and make sure the practice time was as efficient as possible and then be able to track what kind of improvement we were delivering to the bottom line as well.

Jasha Fletcher 

That’s where Axonify comes in. We did look at a number of suppliers, technology suppliers and Axonify ticks all of the boxes because it’s a highly intelligent knowledge platform wrapped in game mechanics. Because Axonify uses brain science and techniques such as space repetition to reinforce the learning in the classroom, it’s a really engaging way to embed what people have learned using gamification. The platform personalizes the learning experience. It activates minds to remember key points more efficiently, pushing out content to help fill knowledge gaps and it drives engagement using game like behaviors. This cognitive state means that people remember more, the game like behaviors trigger people, what matters to people and they can actually have matches with their best mates and beat their scores.

Jasha Fletcher

They want to do their own learning because they want to improve their achievements and it’s got a really cool app that people can actually download onto their personal phones and use learning anytime on any device. They don’t necessarily have to be in the business[inaudible 00:35:16] a desktop or in a classroom to be able to learn.

Jasha Fletcher 

Let’s hear from one of our colleagues, Jamie, who actually has been with us for a couple of years now and he went through the new entrant training where we transformed it with the Axonify platform. You might want to turn off the sounds on your computers if you’ve not got the[inaudible 00:35:38] just so that you can actually hear the story. Here we go.

Jamie 

Hi, my name is Jamie and here’s what I love about iLearn. Every morning I do love to get my notification from the app just to make sure that I get my points for that day so I’m top of the team. Since she’s an iLearn, this has greatly improved my knowledge around our products which has enabled me then to give our customers the great service that they deserve. I’ve seen a massive improvement within my bonus and my performance as well. Every week I’ve got a competition going with that date within my team, every week I’m taught you can’t beat me with the points.

Jasha Fletcher 

I should have mentioned that Axonify is the platform but internally in BT we actually call it iLearn and that is why Jamie was referring to iLearn. As you can see, it’s highly engaging in a fun way to learn but it’s also very completely different way to learn for our new entrance. Before we introduced it and rolled it out to all of our courses, we had to do quite a lot of engagement with our stakeholders and so we run a trial. What I’d want to do is just share some of the learnings from this trial. To be absolutely successful, we needed to gain the buy in of the senior stakeholders. It was something that we wanted to make sure that the stakeholders had confidence in what we were doing, we made sure that they had some software demos of the platform, we shared some case studies and success stories that Axonify provided for roles from global companies such as Walmart, Toyota and another contact center business in the UK called Sitel who had a lot of success with Axonify so we were able to compare against an industry company.

Jasha Fletcher 

We saw the levels of success that they were getting and this helped us to create some compelling reasons to try this different approach in our learning and it goes back to what David said earlier about, “you can’t do this by yourself as an HR or retraining function,” you’ve got to make sure that you’ve got those[inaudible 00:38:00] stakeholders and senior stakeholders who are going to help make the decisions at the end of the trial as well.

Jasha Fletcher 

We agreed to trial and created a high level implementation plan with key milestones and then we work together with our operational colleagues and stakeholders to make sure that the change that we were delivering was actually going to deliver some successful business outcomes. That’s one of the mantras that Axonify do promote and support you with when you’re implementing this platform. It’s based on what is the business outcome that you’re trying to achieve, then what do your people need to do to be able to achieve that business outcome and what do they need to know? And then you build the content based on that. That’s how we did… that’s how we work it through. What happened was we actually made sure that with the trial, we identified some control centers who were… had very similar environment, similar types of calls to our trial groups, and we could actually compare the results to because I’d highly recommend that you do have control group when you’re trying to introduce something new with your onboarding program so that you can compare the impact that it’s had on the business, as well as your people.

Jasha Fletcher 

This was really important for us to be able to provide the value to our stakeholders. We made sure that we had a control group and what we did was regularly evaluated the feedback from the leaders and the learners and indeed our trainers who were involved in the trial. We run it over a 12 week period, there was four managers involved, 44 advisors and we compared it with two similar teams in different centers. What that enabled us to do was to agree any fine tuning very quickly, we were able to roll out to extra… to wider teams once we seen the success of it and we’re also be able to share the plans and timelines and we have the full support as well of our Axonify success team who supported us through the implementation and the trial.

Jasha Fletcher 

What we found was that, in the end of the evaluation, we’ve actually delivered a great boss from a people point of view and just by reducing the durations, we managed to deliver over half a million pounds worth of benefit to the business. I’ll come on to the results in a bit so you can just see how that impacted the overarching results and the people but before I do that, let’s just hear from our sponsor, our key stakeholder who was Sam Calvert, who is the Sales Director.

Sam Calvert 

Gamified learning has had a massively positive impact on our new advisors. They are excited, more knowledgeable and much more confident when they complete their training. In fact, they are raring to answer calls and give our customers a brilliant experience. The leader boards have driven competition and have helped quickly form bonds amongst new colleagues. We’ve seen advisors who are willing to share their experience of gamified learning on that internal social network and the managers have told us how the new teams are proactively tapping into the learning during periods of quiet time and between calls. This is keeping energy levels really high and our advisors really engaged, ready to talk to our customers. Business and results have improved too, not only did we reduce the length of training by five days but calls were shorter, we had fewer complaints and less customers calling us back. Plus, we kept more customers and we increased the value of customers by selling them more.

Sam Calvert 

These improvements continue throughout the rollout of new entrant training and I’m confident we can replicate these results in other areas. That’s why I’m about to start using gamified learning with existing advisors and more of my call centers.

Jasha Fletcher 

That’s Sam sharing some of the business results but you guys know as well as I do that it’s not just about the business results. Any kind of cultural change that you want to bed in needs individuals to understand the benefits to them. What we did was went out to our people to get some survey results from the people to understand, what did they feel about it. Sam’s already mentioned in the video that people were shouting about their achievements on our social media internet sites, it was actually motivating people to want to learn and here you can see that on the survey, 85% of people liked the leader boards and competing with their peers for the top scores using the platform.

Jasha Fletcher 

We had 96% who actually noticed themselves that their knowledge in certain topic areas had increased since we started the pilot and the learning. They’ve been very vocal about this as well and sharing that with colleagues as well as us and given us the feedback. It’s a really great new thoughts… new story from a survey point of view and I just selected just a few highlights from what our learners and managers were saying from the trial and some of our new entrants there. It’s given them a more relaxed way of learning than they’ve had before and we can definitely see the competence confidence growing.

Jasha Fletcher 

We’ve seen this[inaudible 00:43:20] well, so as many organizations will get the voice of the customer and we can see that some of the comments that came through from our new entrants when we had the NPS customer surveys was that people loved that the advisors were knowledgeable, they were efficient, and even got a little kiss there from the customer in the middle… at the end of their text when they responded to their survey. All of these advisors are delivering a better customer experience, thanks to greater knowledge and being able to keep those knowledge levels top with this new way of learning.

Jasha Fletcher

Sam mentioned some of the results and the business benefits that we’ve delivered but here is just a quick summary of the business impact that we’ve had since we’ve introduced this way of learning as part of our onboarding. We can see knowledge growth levels because there’s a great dashboard within the Axonify platform that gives you the reports and the insights, we can actually see how much the knowledge levels are growing in each of the topics. From the first time the individual completes that topic, to the latest time that they’ve completed the topic. You can see the knowledge growth, which is great, it’s not something that we’ve been able to easily analyze previously, and the call handling times have reduced because our advisors are more confident, they are more competent and therefore they are more efficient when they’re dealing with customer queries. We reduced the overall duration of the classroom and so… people don’t want to learn in the classroom. Why spend so much time in the classroom? David mentioned there that you want to be going out as much as possible into the environment and we definitely move more towards that so we reduce the training by five days.

Jasha Fletcher 

As I mentioned, the customer value, which is, what do we actually do and what the customer is actually worth[inaudible 00:45:13] we’ve managed to improve that by 5% by offering more products and services that will benefit the customer in their lifestyle. We’ve seen that complaints have reduced as well so we get in fewer complaints by using this new way of working. Certainly from our point of view, it has worked. We’ve rolled it out[inaudible 00:45:32] the organization and as I mentioned, that we have been running some trials with our tenured advisors now to roll this way of learning using the Axonify platform out and we’re seeing some great benefits from that as well. I’d really recommend looking at gamified learning to mix it up a little bit with your onboarding programs. I’m just going to go back to Lindsay now and see if there’s any other questions Lindsay that we’ve had. Thank you.

Lindsay Snider 

Thank you Jasha for walking us through your onboarding journey. It was a great discussion. We do have a few questions and if anyone on the line has any questions again, the question pan is on the right hand side. This one’s for you Jasha. What was the one learning and development business impact that you were most shocked by?[crosstalk 00:46:33].

Jasha Fletcher

I would say it’s probably adding the value to the customer, 5% value to customer that’s actually quite a lot of monetary value and being able to[inaudible 00:46:49] and being able to articulate that and be able to say, “that is a direct impact” or something that the HR organization have implemented was pretty out of proud moments because I think for us that work in HR and training, it’s quite challenging to be able to showcase the value add, training and learning delivers to individuals. Being able to share that and it being so high was definite positive.

Lindsay Snider 

Wonderful. We have one more question that will be coming through and maybe we’ll go to David for this one first and Jasha if you have anything to add on after, what are the biggest mistakes companies are making when onboarding new employees?

David Perring 

That’s a good question. Probably not talking to the people who come through the door. I think that’s probably the biggest mistake because ultimately, the thing that guides us is the customer view and if your customers aren’t happy and you think your on your own borders is your customers, then that is going to be the biggest mistake. If you’re not temperature checking whether or how they feel then actually your onboarding processes has failed. The only way that you can make coherent decisions about what you should improve, what needs to change is by engaging them[inaudible 00:48:15] that’s probably the biggest mistake. I would probably hazard a guess that a few of you have had a onboarding survey or had anybody follow up with you about what your onboarding is like and without that insight, then no changes can happen. I don’t know Jasha if you got some thoughts that you put into the[inaudible 00:48:35].

Jasha Fletcher 

I agree with you David. I think that’s really important and we tend to do surveys of first seven days and then 30 days and then 60 days when our employees join us. We tend to get the surveys and the feedback and actually based on some of that feedback that we’ve had, on looking at the care elements of the 7 C’s, we are working actually on making a big focus on day one just being about the individual, perhaps doing volunteering activities, making sure everybody goes to lunch, you mentioned that earlier and just helping people to understand that it’s all about them and kind of congratulating them on actually getting to that first day as well because they have gone through a really challenging recruitment process to get there as well. We are swapping out quite a lot of the usual first day activities to just focus on the individuals and getting them together, doing a little bit more of that people focused activity.

David Perring 

I think Jasha also set a really high bar really illustrating the impact of a great onboarding experience and obviously she’s swimming in data and so many numbers which are fantastic[inaudible 00:49:51] benchmark things everybody else should aspire to do but equally asking the customer also, having clear goals about what your onboarding’s trying to achieve is probably another common mistake. Those aren’t articulated that clear enough and Jasha hit that went out of the park unlike the English cricket team.

Jasha Fletcher 

Yeah. That performance ain’t quite[inaudible 00:50:12]

Lindsay Snider 

We have another question. What key elements would you advise make for a successful pre onboarding experience? So maybe we’ll start with Jasha.

Jasha Fletcher 

It’s something that I’m looking at actually. I’ve been working with the Axonify team on doing that and I think it’s the consistency. If we offer a pre boarding content we need to make sure that whatever we get back from that content or the interaction that the people do continues into day one and then we have some system challenges because a lot of our systems don’t get enabled until day one. There’s some work going on there and I think that is the challenge and making sure that you’re not actually… that you’re inviting people to take part in onboarding and it’s a choice that they make, rather than something that they feel that it needs to do because going back to the culture, that could have a negative impact if you don’t do it properly.

Jasha Fletcher 

For us we’re looking at, [inaudible 00:51:20] invited, people feel comfortable that they want to take part in and do it and if they do take part in it, that we then make sure that everything that they’ve completed is continued into day one. We use that information to make their day one, the best day one that they can have when they join the company.

Lindsay Snider   

Is there anything you’d like to add to that David?

David Perring 

Not really[inaudible 00:51:47] Jasha[inaudible 00:51:48] hit that on the head. I think there is something about that volunteer in the invite which is sounds perfect but also I think just need to look at the customer, think about their journey and think what would accelerate and inform them, make them feel more comfortable on day one. A lot of it is some of the domestics if that makes sense, so enable them to make choices, made for them to make connections once they sign the contract. The challenge quite often is like Jasha says, the process that you have which makes somebody[inaudible 00:52:19] employee doesn’t often kick in so you need to do a little bit of engineering and other parts of the HR process to create a transitional state, which means they’ve accepted but they haven’t joined.

David Perring

I think there is something about accelerate and inform and those acceleration can come down to some of the hygiene factors of who you got to see, when booking kit, if you’ve got clothing that you’re supposed to wear make sure that people have already specified their sizing. I think you can think about the things that matter to people that would be great on day one and I think, always think about what’s the story? If somebody was stood in the cafe or sat in a park with their friends and they said, “This is why it’s been really great to join this organization” just think about the stories of things that happened in their journey and you can map that out in weeks, out in front before they join you can map it to the weeks after. Just thinking each one of these things as being a moment of truth which tells your culture and what it’s like and encourages people to get the highest performance and be propelled into your organization. I heard somebody a long time ago talk about onboarding as being selling and propelling.

David Perring 

Once they[inaudible 00:53:26] you sold to them, obviously think about how you really get them happy and engaged and connected and feel like they belong and energized and everything that you do around those 7 C’s [inaudible 00:53:37] helps give you a framework to think, “what can be improved?”

Lindsay Snider 

I totally agree and I think that’s brilliant. I don’t think we have any other questions so we’re going to close out today. I want to thank you again David and Jasha for joining us, for a great discussion today. There’s been a lot of great takeaways and great nuggets that we can take and people can take back from this presentation so from the research behind the 7 C’s, to the real world example, that Jasha you provide it, it really shows this onboarding is done right to not only give your new employees a good experience but will also provide value to your bottom line. Thank you everyone who joined, let me look forward to our next discussion with you all.

David Perring 

Thanks Lindsay. I think Jasha’s case study is probably one of the best one I’ve seen for a very long time, so there’s a lot to learn from what she’s done there. Thanks everybody for joining and thanks Jasha and Lindsay for having me.

Lindsay Snider 

No problem, thanks, guys.